5 Tips to Overcome Being Camera Shy

I absolutely hate having my photo taken, especially when it's done professionally. It makes me so uncomfortable and nervous! However, I've also learned a lot from my time in front of the camera, and I'd like to share some tips that have helped me.

1. Be Confident

First, do everything within your power to feel confident and look great. If that means buying a new outfit, do it! Avoid wearing clothing that will constantly need adjusted or won't stay in place. Every time I have to fix my clothing during a shoot, my confidence begins to fade. You'll want to be focused on having fun, not monitoring your wardrobe.

Also, if you able to, get your hair and makeup done professionally so you can be worry free about your appearance. If that's not possible, practice doing your hair and makeup beforehand.

2. What to Wear

If you've got questions about what to wear, ask your photographer what they'd suggest. When in doubt, go with a solid color. It's also ok to bring more than one outfit to the shoot and ask for your photographer’s preference.

3. Open Communication

Before the shoot starts, let your photographer know about any insecurities you have. Whether you’re self-conscious about a body part, hair falling out of place or a fake smile, let your photographer know so they can work with you on minimizing those details in your photos.

Similarly, if you have a concern during your photo shoot, just ask about it. It's ok to ask, “how is my smile/hair/hand placement/etc”. Telling your photographer about your worry will help them be able to reassure you, rather than capturing photos of your growing concern.

4. Snacks Are Always a Good Idea

If your shoot is going to be longer than an hour, bring snacks and water. No one likes working on a hungry tummy or being dehydrated. You'll have time to eat walking between locations, or you can ask for a quick break.

5. Relax

Most important of all, relax! You've hired a professional whose work you love and can trust! Have fun with the shoot and leave the hard work up to the photographer.